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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Infection of Caesarean-Derived Colostrum-Deprived (Cdcd) One-Day-Old Piglets with Arcobacter Butzleri, Arcobacter Cryaerophilus and Arcobacter Skirrowii

Authors
item Wesley, Irene
item Baetz, Albert
item Larson, D - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Swine Research Report
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Technical Abstract: Neonatal piglets have been used as models to study human campylobacteriosis and helicobacteriosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative pathogenicity, based on the duration of fecal shedding and colonization of tissues, of three Arcobacter species in one-day-old Caesarean-derived colostrum-deprived (CDCD) piglets. Two experiments were conducted. In Experiment I, two piglets each were infected per os with either Arcobacter butzleri ATCC 49616, Arcobacter cryaerophilus 1B ATCC 43159, Arcobacter skirrowii CCUG 10374, or with the three field strains of A. butzleri (approximately 5 x 10**9 CFU per piglet). Rectal swabs were taken prior to infection and daily thereafter for up to 7 days. Arcobacter spp. were detected at least once in rectal swabs of all but one of the experimentally infected piglets, but not in the control. At necropsy, arcobacters were recovered from the lung, kidney, ileum, or brain of only the 4 infected piglets which had received either the field strain or the ATCC type strain of A. butzleri. No gross pathological lesions were consistently noted in the experimentally infected piglets. In Experiment II, two piglets each were infected per os with A. butzleri ATCC 49616, A. cryaerophilus 1A ATCC 43158, A. skirrowii CCUG 10374, or the single A. butzleri field strain Yard J/c (approximately 5 x 10**9 CFU per piglet). Arcobacter spp. were cultured from rectal swabs of all but one of the experimentally infected piglets at least once. At necropsy Arcobacter spp. were cultured from the liver, kidney, ileum, or brain of two of the four A. butzleri-infected piglets. However, no severe gross pathology was noted. These data suggest that Arcobacter spp., especially A. butzleri, can colonize neonatal pigs.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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