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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of Rwr-Tetra-1 Tetraploid Russian Wildrye Germplasm

Authors
item Jensen, Kevin
item Asay, Kay
item Johnson, Douglas
item Horton, William
item Palazzo, A - U S ARMY COLD REGIONS RES
item Chatterton, N

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 16, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Russian wildrye (RWR) germplasm (RWR-TETRA-1) is the first RWR germplasm released in the United States. This new germplasm has 28 chromosomes compared to 14 found in the traditional RWR cultivars. It has improved seedlig and establishment vigor. Morphologically, RWR-Tetra-1 is taller, has wider and longer leaves, thicker culms, and heavier seeds than existing diploid cultivars. Under environments which range between 450-500 mm of annual precipitation, dry matter production is equal to or greater than current cultivars. However, when evaluated on harsher sites (250-350 mm of annual precipitation) and under closer row spacings (0.5 versus 1.0 m), yields were equal to or less than current cultivars.

Technical Abstract: Russian wildrye germplasm (RWR-TETRA-1) was developed by the USDA-ARS Forage and Range Research Laboratory in cooperation with the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station at Utah State University. This 26-line composite was released by the two agencies in 1997 as source material for genetic studies and for the development of improved cultivars of tetraploid Russian wildrye. The 10 parental tetraploid accessions of RWR were donated by the N. I. Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry (VIR), St. Petersburg, Russia. The accessions have been entered into the National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) as PI numbers 565063 to 565072. It is the first release of naturally occurring tetraploid RWR germplasm. Morphologically, RWR-Tetra-1 is taller, has wider and longer leaves, thicker culms, and heavier seeds than existing diploid cultivars. Spike characteristics are similar to diploid RWR. In environments with 450-500 mm of annual precipitation, dry matter production is equal to or greater than current cultivars. When evaluated on harsh sites (250-350 mm of annual precipitation) and under closer row spacings (0.5 versus 1.0 m), yields were equal to or less than current cultivars.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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