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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Development of Bacterial Biofilms During Poultry Processing

Author
item Arnold, Judy

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 17, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Research on the characteristics of bacterial attachment to surfaces during poultry processing presents the opportunity for reduction of pathogens and spoilage organisms and for prevention of biofilm formation. Processing poultry meat products causes broiler carcasses to come in contact with many solid surfaces. Bacteria from the carcasses can attach to wet equipment surfaces, form biofilms, and provide a ready source of cross-contamination for subsequent carcasses. The surface properties of bacterial cells within a biofilm vary considerably and may be related to their function within the community. Equipment and plant surface materials differ in affinity for bacterial attachment and biofilm formation. The surface structures and rate of attachment of bacteria were studied as biofilms developed on the equipment surface materials. An increasingly complex extracellular matrix of fibrils and debris connected individual cells, and many bacteria aligned in side-to-side arrangements. An increased understanding of bacterial attachment and biofilm formation will enable us to develop interventions to counteract these processes and thereby enhance plant sanitation practices and pathogen control.

Technical Abstract: Research on the characteristics of bacterial attachment to surfaces during poultry processing presents the opportunity for reduction of pathogens and spoilage organisms and for prevention of biofilm formation. Processing poultry meat products causes broiler carcasses to come in contact with many solid surfaces. Bacteria from the carcasses can attach to wet equipment surfaces, form biofilms, and provide a ready source of cross-contamination for subsequent carcasses. The surface properties of bacterial species within a biofilm vary considerably and may be related to their function within the community. Equipment and plant surface materials differ in affinity for bacterial attachment and biofilm formation. The surface structures and kinetics for attachment of bacteria were followed as biofilms developed on the equipment surface materials. An increasingly complex extracellular matrix of fibrils and debris connected individual cells, and many bacteria aligned in side-to-side arrangements. An increased understanding of bacterial attachment and biofilm formation will enable us to develop interventions to counteract these processes and thereby enhance plant sanitation practices and pathogen control.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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