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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Laboratory Toxicity of Insecticide Residues to Orius Insidiosus, Geocoris Punctipes, Hippodamia Convergens, and Chrysoperla Carnea

Authors
item Elzen, Gary
item Elzen, Patti
item King, Edgar

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 30, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Conservation of insect natural enemies is a desirable component of integrated pest management (IPM). Cotton, in particular, often receives several applications of insecticides that can disrupt natural enemies. Information on the toxicity of various cotton insecticides to key beneficial species is therefore important in selection of compounds that will minimize mortality. Insect predators, namely, the insidious flower bug, big-eyed bug, convergent lady beetle, and green lacewing were evaluated in spray chamber bioassays to ten insecticides, including four newer insecticides with novel modes of action. There was considerable variation in response among the species tested. In general, malathion was more toxic than other insecticides to all species. Green lacewings were highly sensitive to most of the insecticides. One-half of the insecticides caused no mortality in big-eyed bugs; insidious flower bugs and lady beetles were more sensitive. Spinosad, an insecticide targeted for foliage-feeding insects, was less toxic than other insecticides tested on all species. Cotton IPM is highly complex and relies on many factors. However, any understanding we can gain regarding the selectivity of pesticides will be beneficial. It is particularly important to obtain data on the newer insecticides with novel modes of action, because these may replace conventional insecticides for use on resistant pest insects.

Technical Abstract: Adults obtained from laboratory cultures of the insidious flower bug, Orius insidiosus (Say), big-eyed bug, Geocoris punctipes (Say), convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, and green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens, were treated with ten insecticides, including four newer insecticides with novel modes of action, using a spray chamber bioassay. There was considerable variation in response among the species tested to the insecticides. In general, malathion was more toxic than other insecticides to all species. Chrysoperla carnea was highly sensitive to most of the insecticides. One-half of the insecticides caused no mortality in G. punctipes; O. insidiosus and H. convergens were more sensitive. Spinosad was less toxic than other insecticides tested on all species.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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